sábado, 22 de octubre de 2016

WRITING EXERCISE.





Please read and follow the instructions of the pdf writing exercise you will find in the link.

VOLCANOES AND LANSLIDES.









The Geology of Canary Islands. www.islandsinocean.com

The Canary Islands, located between 100 and 500 km from the coast of northwestern Africa (Morocco), consist of seven major volcanic islands forming a rough west-southwest to east-northeast trending archipelago. Together with the Selvagen Islands and a group of seven major seamount complexes (some of which were former Canary Islands) to the northeast, they form the Canary volcanic province. Volcanism in this ∼800-km-long and ∼400-km-wide volcanic belt (located at 33–27° N and 18–12° W) decreases in age from the northeast (Lars Seamount, 68 million years) to the southwest (Hierro Island, 1 million years) and is interpreted to represent the Canary hotspot track (Fig. 1). The Canary volcanic province is located on Jurassic ocean crust (∼150 million years old beneath the western part of the province to ∼180 million years old beneath the eastern part of the province), and contains some of the oldest ocean crust preserved in ocean basins.
GEOLOGICAL OVERVIEW OF THE EVOLUTION OF THE ISLANDS
The morphology of the Canary morphology of the Canary volcanic province show systematic changes from southwest to northeast, reflecting an increase in age (Figs. 1) and a change in evolutionary stage. As the volcanoes age, they originally go through a constructive phase of evolution in which growth of the edifice through volcanic activity outpaces its destruction through mass wasting (e.g., landsliding) and erosion.


 FIGURE 1. Bathymetric map showing the Canary (red) and Madeira (blue) volcanic provinces, including islands and associated seamounts, in the eastern central North Atlantic. Thick dashed lines mark centers of possible hotspot tracks. For clarity, only depth contours above 3500 m are shown. Bathymetric data from Smith and Sandwell (1997); ages and location of the Azores–Gibraltar fracture zone from Geldmacher et al. (2005) and Guillou et al. (1996).

martes, 18 de octubre de 2016


PRESENT TENSES





Simple Present FROM HTTPS://MAGOOSH.COM

Form: Use the base form of a verb, adding an /s/ to the end of the verb if the subject
is singular. (Unless the verb is irregular, in which case other rules may apply.)

Uses:
Use 1: Actions that are habitual or routine
EXAMPLES: The sun rises. I brush my teeth twice a day.
Use 2: General, timeless facts
EXAMPLES: Spiders make webs. Babies drink milk.
Use 3: Narrative style (used when recalling past events or announcing things that are
happening in the moment)

EXAMPLES: So I go to the store yesterday, and the clerk says “We’re closed!” He hits the baseball out of the field and makes a home run!
Use 4: The “real” present (things that are happening right now), but ONLY when the
verb is stative. Stative verbs deal with the way the subject is, instead of what the
subject does.

EXAMPLES: That car looks old. They think that’s a bad idea.
  


Present Perfect

Form: Have or has + past form of a verb
Uses:
Use 1: Actions that started in the past, continue into the present, and may continue
into the future

EXAMPLES: The children have felt sick ever since they ate lunch. My neighbor has lived next door to me for two years.
Use 2: Separate actions that happened in the past and may happen again in the
future

EXAMPLES: That man has traveled overseas several times. We have eaten at that restaurant once or twice.
Use 3: Recently completed actions that still influence things happening in the
present

EXAMPLES: The sun has risen and you need to wake up. They have finished their meeting, so now they can go.
 


Present Continuous

Form: The present tense of “to be” (am/is/are)+ verb + ing
Uses:
Use 1: The “real” present (things that are happening right now), for all verbs except
stative verbs

EXAMPLES: I am sitting down right now. He can’t come to the phone because he is working. You can’t see the children because they are hiding.
Use 2: Temporary actions that may not be happening right now, but have not yet been completed
EXAMPLES: I am taking an English course. The truck is being repaired. Plans are
being made.


EXERCISE ONE
EXERCISE TWO
EXERCISE THREE
 

viernes, 14 de octubre de 2016

INFINITIVES AND GERUNDS (2). ALL YOU WANTED TO KNOW AND NERVER DARED TO ASK...





EXERCISES

El gerundio y el infinitivo son formas de los verbos que actúan como nombres. El gerundio se forma con “-ing” (walking, eating, etc.). Como hemos visto en la lección sobre los verbos, el infinitivo se forma con la preposición “to” (to walk, to eat, etc.).

Grammatical Rules (Reglas gramaticales)

1. Cuando un verbo sigue a otro verbo, siempre necesitamos usar el infinitivo o el gerundio. Normalmente usamos el infinitivo después de algunos verbos y el gerundio después de otros. También hay verbos con los que podemos usar el gerundio o el infinitivo.
Verbo Gerundio Infinitivo
  afford
X
  agree
X
  attempt
X
  begin X X
  choose
X
  continue X X
  decide
X
  detest X
  enjoy X
  expect
X
  fail
X
  finish X
  hate X X
  hope
X
  imagine X
  intend
X
  keep X
  learn
X
  like X X
  love X X
  manage
X
  need
X
  offer
X
  plan
X
  prefer X X
  promise
X
  quit X
  recommend X
  refuse
X
  regret X
  seem
X
  start X X
  suggest X
  tend
X
  threaten
X
  tolerate X
  try X X
  understand X
  want
X
  wish X X
Ejemplos:
  I can’t afford to buy a new car. (No puedo permitirme comprar un coche nuevo.)
  He began to doubt himself. / He began doubting himself. (Comenzó a dudar de sí mismo.)
  They decided to move to Australia in May. (Decidieron mudarse a Australia en Mayo.)
  I enjoy listening to music. (Disfruto escuchar música.)
  She hates studying. / She hates to study. (Odia estudiar.)
  You love dancing. / You love to dance. (Te encanta bailar.)
  He needed to leave class early because he had an appointment. (Tenía que salir de la clase pronto porque tenía una cita.)
  She can’t tolerate complaining. (No puede tolerar quejas.)
  I tried learning English. / I tried to learn English. (He intentado aprender inglés.)
  My mother could retire, but she keeps working. (Mi madre podría jubilarse, pero sigue trabajando.)
2. Podemos usar el gerundio o el infinitivo como objeto, sujeto o complemento de una frase, pero en general, es mucho más común usar el gerundio como sujeto.
Ejemplos:
Objeto:
  I like cooking. / I like to cook. (Me gusta cocinar)
  She continued working. / She continued to work. (Continuó trabajando.)
Sujeto:
  Swimming is good exercise. (Nadar es un buen ejercicio)
  Drinking and driving is dangerous. (Beber y conducir es peligroso.)
Complemento:
  The best thing to do when you are sick is to drink a lot of water. (Lo mejor que puedes hacer cuando estás enfermo es beber mucha agua.)
  My favorite exercise is swimming. (Mi ejercicio favorito es la natación.)
3. Con algunos verbos, cuando usamos el gerundio o el infinitivo, el significado cambia.
forget (olvidar), mean (significar), remember (recordar),
stop (parar)
Ejemplos:
Gerundio:
  I forgot writing that email. (Me olvidé escribiendo ese correo electrónico.)
Infinitivo:
  I forgot to write that email. (Me olvidé de escribir el correo electrónico.)
Gerundio:
  Stop watching the news. (Deja de ver las noticias)
Infinitivo:
  Stop to watch the news. (Para, para ver las noticias.)
4. Se usa el infinitivo después de adjetivos.
disappointed (decepcionado), glad (contento), happy (feliz),
pleased (satisfecho), relieved (aliviado), sad (triste),
surprised (sorprendido)
Ejemplos:
  I’m glad to see you. (Me alegro de verte.)
  She was surprised to find the door unlocked. (Se sorprendió al encontrar la puerta abierta.)
5. Después de preposiciones solo podemos usar el gerundio.
about (sobre), against (contra), at (a), after (después de),
before (antes), by (por), on (en), without (sin)
Ejemplos:
  He’s good at listening. (Escucha bien.)
  I always read before going to bed. (Siempre leo antes de acostarme.)
  You can’t leave without saying goodbye. (No puedes salir sin despedirte.)
6. Se usa el gerundio después de unos nombres.
advantage/disadvantage of (la ventaja de, la desventaja de),
danger of (el peligro de), experience in (experiencia en),
interested in (interesado en), opportunity of (oportunidad de),
reason for (la razón de), problem with (el problema con)
Ejemplos:
  What is the advantage of waiting? (¿Cuál es la ventaja de esperar?)
  I am interested in taking an English class. (Estoy interesado en tomar una clase de inglés.)
  His problem finding a new job was his lack of experience. (Su problema para encontrar un nuevo empleo era su falta de experiencia.)
7. Se usa el gerundio después de unas expresiones o verbos frasales.
to look forward to (tener ganas de), to be worth (valer),
can’t help (no poder evitar), don’t mind (no importarse),
feel like (no apetecerse)
Ejemplos:
  We’re really looking forward to seeing you. (Tenemos muchas ganas de verte.)
  That movie was not worth seeing. (No vale la pena ver esa película.)
  I can’t help falling in love. (No puedo evitar enamorarme.)   

jueves, 13 de octubre de 2016

CONCURSO DE COCINA DE HALLOWEEN.

CONCURSO DE COCINA DE HALLOWEEN.

ESCUELA OFICIAL DE IDIOMAS DEL PUERTO DE LA CRUZ.

BASES 
 

Concursantes:
Podrán participar todos l@s alumn@s matriculad@s en esta escuela oficial de idiomas para el presente curso 2016-2017. Cada concursante sólo podrá participar con un plato.
Tema:
El tema será el de Halloween.
Modalidades:
Habrá dos modalidades:
- el plato más rico
- el plato con la mejor presentación
Entrega del plato:
Los platos se entregarán en el Salón de actos a las 18:30 horas el 31 de octubre.
Premios:
Se entregarán dos premios (consistentes en un vale valorado en 20 € cada uno) al plato con mejor presentación y al plato más rico.
Comisión evaluadora:
La comisión evaluadora estará integrada por el claustro de profesores de la escuela y el representante de alumnos en el Consejo Escolar de la escuela.
Entrega de premios:
La entrega de premios tendrá lugar el 31 de octubre a las 20:30 horas en el salón de actos de esta escuela.
Aceptación de bases:
Los concursantes, por el hecho de participar en el concurso, aceptan todas las cláusulas de estas bases.

 

jueves, 6 de octubre de 2016

GERUNDS AND INFINITIVES




There are certain words in English that are usually followed by an infinitive or gerund. If you are not sure whether to use the infinitive or gerund, check out our lists or look the words up in a dictionary. From www.ego-4U.com

Infinitive


Use

Certain words are followed by an infinite verb with or without ‘to’.

Use and Word Lists Example
as the subject of a clause To know you is to love you.
after certain expressions (without ‘to’) Why not go to the cinema?
after certain verbs (without ‘to’) I can swim.
after certain verbs (with ‘to’) He wants to swim.
after certain verbs with interrogatives (infinitive constructions) They don’t know how to swim.
after certain verbs with objects (without ‘to’) He made her swim.
after certain verbs with objects (with ‘to’) They wanted him to swim.
after certain adjectives and their comparisons It’s easier to swim downstream.
after nouns deriving from the verbs mentioned above We made a promise to swim. (derived from the verb ‘to promise’)

Gerund


Form

ing form of the verb

Exceptions in Spelling

See → Present Progressive – Exceptions

Use

Certain words are followed by an Ing-Form.

Use and Word Lists Example
as the subject of a clause Cycling is good for your health.
after certain adjectives He’s afraid of going by plane.
after certain prepositions Before going to bed he turned off the lights.
after certain verbs I enjoy cooking.
after certain verbs with prepositions I am looking forward to seeing you again.
after certain nouns We had problems finding our way back home.

Words followed either by Infinitive or Ing-Form


Use and Word Lists Example
same meaning I started to read. / I started reading.
same meaning but different use She forbids us to talk. / She forbids talking.
different meaning He stopped to smoke. / He stopped smoking.
infinitive or present participle I saw him go up the stairs. / I saw him going up the stairs.

Exercises and Tests


Infinitive



Gerund



Infinitive / Gerund